Bleach as a mold killer?

Chlorine bleach is well known for killing bacteria, and it has no rivals when it comes to removing color.  But is bleach effective in killing mold?  Not really. Here’s why:

  1. It is too diluted and thus too weak to permanently kill mold unless the mold is simply sitting on top of a hard surface like a counter top or sink.
  2. What little killing power chlorine bleach does have is diminished significantly as the bleach sits in warehouses and on grocery store shelves or inside your home or business [50% loss in killing power in just the first 90 days inside a never opened jug or container] Chlorine ions constantly escapes through the plastic walls of its containers.
  3. Chlorine bleach’s ion structure also prevents chlorine from penetrating into porous materials such as dry wall and wood— It just stays on the outside surface, whereas mold has protected enzyme roots growing inside the porous construction materials. When you spray porous surface molds with bleach, the water in the water solution soaks into the wood while the bleach chemical sits atop the surface, gasses off, and thus only partially kills the surface layer of mold while the water penetration of the building materials fosters further mold growth.
  4. Chlorine Bleach is not registered with the EPA as a disinfectant to kill mold. You can verify that important fact yourself when you are unable to find an EPA registration number for killing mold on the label of any brand of chlorine bleach.

Do you have a question about mold?  Get straight answers from an expert.

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Majeske Home Inspection Services

Hernick Environmental LLC - 
Frankenmuth, Michigan

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